About your Search

20110301
20110331
STATION
MSNBC 33
KPIX (CBS) 3
WJZ (CBS) 3
KNTV (NBC) 2
WRC (NBC) 2
WUSA (CBS) 2
WBAL (NBC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 46
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)
japan. we'll have answers for you here tonight. >>> the struggle of those rebels in libya to now get the upper hand as nbc's richard engel lives through a close call on the ground. >>> making a difference. with a combination of medical expertise and a higher power. >>> and a screen gem is gone. some say the last of the true movie stars. tonight we'll remember elizabeth taylor. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. we're still in the middle of an air assault on libya. really the third front the u.s. is fighting on these days. it was launched by president obama to protect civilians, he said, because gadhafi's forces were bearing down on the rebels' head quarter city of benghazi. but all those cruise missiles and bombs still haven't stopped the ground fighting. the rebels were under heavy fire today about 100 miles to the south of benghazi. and as you're about to see, our own chief foreign correspondent, richard engel, was with them and got about as close as you'd ever want to. richard is back safely in benghazi tonight and is with us
-- the struggle to contain stricken nuclear power plans. a new dawn in japan. new setback for a country desperately trying to regain control. [ man ] ♪ trouble ♪ trouble, trouble trouble, trouble ♪ ♪ trouble been doggin' my soul ♪ since the day i was born ♪ worry ♪ oh, worry, worry worry, worry ♪ [ announcer ] when it comes to things you care about, leave nothing to chance. travelers. take the scary out of life. how are you getting to a happier place? running there? dancing there? how about eating soup to get there? campbell's soups fill you with good nutrition, farm-grown ingredients, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. you think i have allergies? you're sneezing. i'm allergic to you. doubtful, you love me. hey, you can't take allegra with fruit juice. what? yeah, it's on the label. really? here, there's nothing about juice on the zyrtec® label. what? labels are meant to be read. i'd be lost without you. i knew you weren't allergic to me. [ sneezes ] you know, you can't take allegra with orange juice. thank you for joining
. frightening moments for some workers at that troubled nuclear power plant in japan. what made them flee for their lives. >>> searching for spring. unseasonably cold weather puts a chill on the cherry blossoms and many areas of this country. >>> and summer breeze. why it might be a whole lot easier to find a summer job in twlechbt. >>> good morning, everyone, i'm alex witt. welcome to "msnbc sunday." let's get to what's happening right now beginning with new this morning. robert gates says the obama administration has no plans to remove gadhafi from power using military force. instead top u.s. officials are working diplomatic channels to try and push the dictator o. hiarcltoonme t a very clear message to gadhafi, but we're also sending a message to people around him. do you really want to be a pariah? do you really want to end up in the international criminal court? now is your time to get out of this and to help change the direction. >> mike viqueira, good sunday morning to you. >> reporter: good morning action al alex. >> what else are we hearing? >> reporter: critics say there's somet
: now to japan. a u.n. expert says radiation continues to leak from those damaged nuclear reactors but progress is being made. all six reactors are now hooked up to power lines-- a step toward getting the cooling systems working once the electricity is turned on the number of workers at the plant is now up to a thousand. meanwhile, the official death toll from the earthquake and tsunami is approaching 10,000 with nearly 14,000 missing. more than a quarter million survivors have no homes or have been forced to leave them. from japan tonight, here's lucy craft. >> reporter: cardboard houses now home for thousands living on the floor of a sports arena outside tokyo. all survived the tsunami and quake only to be caught up in a radiation scare. this fifth grader says "we escaped to my school but when they said even that was not safe, we came here." natives of iwaki like to boast about its postcard scenery and mild climate. the now notorious fukushima nuclear plant only 30 miles away has triggered a mass exodus. "from all sides everyone kept telling us get out of here" says this beautici
. the focus simply on their survival in japan. they're either homeless or forced to evacuate their longstanding neighborhoods, and today there's anxiety about food safety. elevated levels of radiation have been detected. after the government banned sails of milk from the fukushima prefecture because of contamination and sales from leafy vegetables from areas as far away as 160 miles. doctor, as wee hearing about this, and simply the numbers are astounding, more than 400,000 people have been displaced. now they're getting the news that some of the food they've been having access to could be contaminated. what's the reaction, what's the response that these people are supposed to have to this? >> right now we really don't know all the information wire going to need to tell people what they can eat and what they can't. the problem with radiation, particularly as it deals with problems in the seawater is there's two kinds of radiation. one eye odied 31, and one cesium 37. the risk here for fish is that these foods, like fish, could concentrate these toxins just the way mercury con
nuear site in japan, the power has been restored. they warn it will take days and weeks before they can turn it on. >>> tim pawlenty explores a run in 2012. >>> four former president's together honors one, a rare washington tribute to bush. >>> they are trying to extend the no-fly zone west towards tripoli. jim maceda is live in the libyan capital. bring us up to date as to what happened overnight and this morning. >> reporter: well, yeah, there are a lot of moving parts right now, andrea. first of all, a little more detail on the f-15 crash. that occurred 24 miles east of benghazi. the two pilots are now in safe u.s. hands. that is a rebel controlled part of the country. all of the loyalists or the forces loyal to the regime pulled back from benghazi when the air strike started two days ago and are now about the new front line is about 80 miles south of benghazi. the plane shall as you mentioned, went down due to mechanical failure. it was not gunfire. the plane completely destroyed in the crash. the two pilots managed to pair shoot out. they landed in two separate fields. again, they
radiation from that crippled nuclear power plant in japan with even more people now being encouraged, not forced, to get out of the area. how great is the danger? >>> plus with hispanics making up 1 in every 6 americans and one in every 1 ever 4 children, the huge emphasis on the 2012 election. >>> finally, how does anyone who actually believes they have a chance of winning the republican nomination get heard when people like michele bachmann, sarah palin and donald trump are taking up the oxygen. >>> we start with what's next on the libyan front. nbc chief foreign correspondent d geis bghi, afr heldg up of da. whatapnetoy t ou ilia atoue en >> reporter: today we went out of benghazi. and instead of going to the rebel frontline about 100 miles south of here, we went to the frontline and then went around it. and we were able to get inside the city of ajdabiya. ajdabiya is partially held by gadhafi forces and partially held by the rebels themselves. there is street-to-street fighting in the city. in a way, this is progress, the rebels would not have been able to get this far if gadha
they were threatened and abused by soldiers after they blundered into a army checkpoint. >>> and japan hopes to have one cooling system working tomorrow. >>> i'm very ron ka de la cruz, now back to "hardball." >>> back to "hardball." time for "the sideshow." first up donald trump's brand of foreign policy. screw them. here he is on fox yesterday. >> i think i probably have more experience than anybody, whether i sell them real estate for tremendous amounts of money, i've dealt with everybody. by the way, i could tell you something else. i dealt with gadhafi. >> what did you do? >> you*u)ied the lead. >> excuse me. i rented him a piece of land. he paid me more for one night than the land was worth for the whole year or for two years and then didn't let him use the land. >> was that over in new jersey. >> i don't want to use the word screwed, but i screwed him. that's what we should be doing. >> well it happened during a 2009 visit to the united nations. gadhafi pitched his tent on property owned by donald trump after a lot of noise about it trump had the tent removed. to hear him tell it he k
. i'm thomas roberts. we start in japan where there have been reports of a suspected breach in the core of reactor three. workers were pulled out of the complex as a safety precaution while the possibility of more radiation leaks over that region. japan's prime minister called this situation, quote, very grave and serious during a press conference that was hours after this setback. he reassured the citizens that nuclear techs and the government are taking a cautious approach in each step of this process. >>> the death toll from the dual disasters that rocked the nation continue to rise. more than 10,000 are dead and still 17,000 missing residents. nbc's lee cowan is live in tokyo this morning. lee, what are we hearing right now about the fukushima plant and any kind of extension as a precaution to the japanese exclusion zone for the potential of radiation? >> reporter: well, thomas, there is an extension, although it's still voluntary at this point. the people that were told 19 miles out, 20 miles out that they were told to basically stay indoors over the last couple weeks,
. appreciate your time. >>> in japan, a shortage of bottled water. a live report next. nobody in my family ever had a heart attack. if anything, i thought i'd get hit by a bus, but not a heart. all of a sudden, it's like an earthquake going off in your body. my doctor put me on an aspirin regimen to help protect my life. [ male announcer ] aspirin is not appropriate for everyone. so be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. to my friends, i say, you know, check with your doctor, 'cause it can happen to anybody. [ male announcer ] be ready if a heart attack strikes. donate $5 to womenheart at iamproheart.com, and we'll send you this bayer aspirin pill tote. s it hit helps the lhe of companipanies like the she smallestt ofof startups.ups. th ththat lets yos your employeloy, pa and custcustomersvate and sharee so you can can unleash tsh the of your mor your peopleople. ou but your wrinkles don't. ♪ introducing neutrogena® rapid wrinkle repair. it has the fastest retinol formula available. in fact, it's clinically proven to smooth wrinkles in just one week. so all you h
about food coming from japan amidst its nuclear crisis. >>> and losing his cool. singer chris brown snaps after questions about his assault on former girlfriend rihanna. >>> good morning, everybody, i'm lynn berry. those stories and more are straight ahead. this is "first look" on msnbc. >>> we begin this morning with power struggle. a fourth day of allied strikes have damaged moammar gadhafi's air defense systems but so far the attacks have failed to cripple gadhafi's confidence or put an end to his assaults against civilian opponents. anti-aircraft fire streaked the sky last night over tripoli after a day of heavy fighting between rebels and gadhafi loyalists. despite some success in the south, the inexperienced rebels found themselves outgunned by government forces in the western city of misrata. to the east. gadhafi appeared on libyan television yesterday reportedly speaking from the same tripoli compound targeted by coalition missile strikes on sunday. ever defiant, gadhafi predicted, quote, we will win this battle. meanwhile president obama has cut short his tour of latin amer
in japan. japan's prime minister describes the situation as grave and serious, after another dangerous radiation leak is found at the crippled fukushima nuclear power plant. u.s. navy barges are bringing fresh water to try to head off a meltdown "early" this saturday fresh water to try to head off a meltdown "early" this saturday morning, march 26th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to a gorgeous spring morning in new york city. 20-something degrees. but who cares, it looks nice. >> that's a beautiful picture, russ. >> welcome to "the early show," i'm russ mitchell. >> and i'm rebecca jarvis. we begin with the latest on the battle for libya. rebels have recaptured the key eastern city of ajdabiya. nato takes control of some of the u.s.-led operation in libya in a matter of days, and president obama will address the nation on monday night to explain u.s. involvement in libya. we begin our coverage with cbs news correspondent mandy clark, who is in ajdabiya this morning. mandy, good to see you. >> good morning. well, the streets of ajdabiya are relatively quiet at the moment. b
gadhafi actually survive? >>> plus a top nuclear scientist says the disaster over in japan reminds us over here that the nuclear industry over here in the united states has gained control of the agency, which is supposed to regulate it. the nuclear regulatory commission. in other words, in the nrc, the foxes are guarding the hen house. how do we fix this baby? >>> and the juiciest story of the day for "hardball." it's now likely that michelle bauchmann will launch a exploratory committee. but she says she hasn't decided whether or not to run or not for the president. when was the last time anybody watch canning remember someone forming an exploratory committee running for president and not actually running? by the way, didn't we create her here? let's all thank sarah palin for setting us straight. >>> secretary of state hillary clinton is now about to speak. we're breaking here, breaking news. let's listen to her live. >> 1907 and 1972 and protect the civilians of libya. events have moved very quickly. so let's be clear about where we stand and how we got here. when the libyan people sough
we were paying $2.82 a gallon. that's almost 75 cen cheaper. >>> now to japan where workers have reconnected power lines to all three reactors, but there is still a great to do before the power can be turned on. the hope is then the cooling systems would work properly. meantime, "new york times" is reporting that up gentlemanen's government approved a ten-year extension for the oldest of six reactors at that power station. just a month before the big earthquake, despite safety warnings. nbc's bob bazzell joins me. what's the latest? >> it look likes they may have turned the corner in the battle to get that under control. yesterday seemed to be a bad day. one of the storage pools was very hot and the radiation readings was as high as they've been in the accident. but the radiation levels have come down, there's electricity to all the reactors, but it can't be turned on yet. it will be a while before they get them going, but it seems like the trend is in the direction that everyone wants it to be, but there could still be a lot of surprises ahead. in the disaster zone there's still
. >>> plus the other huge story out of japan. the latest news from japan is not encouraging. smoke out of the two reactors forced workers out of the area today and now traces of radiation have been found in water, in seawater, and in food. and finally, you know things are getting bad for sarah palin when she criticizes president obama in india over his handling of libya and gets bashed by conservatives for being out of her depth. conservatives, mind you, and being illiteratology foreign affairs. >>> we start with the war in libya. richard engel, the best in the business, joins us from tobruk. what is happening in this war? i can't ask a wider question, richard. what is going on in the war? are we going after gadhafi? what are we doing in this war exactly do we know? >> reporter: the rebels here think we are giving them unconditional military support. their only strategy seems to be allow the u.s. and other military powers to scorch the earth and destroy gadhafi's military so that they can make a very slow advance toward tripoli. they do see there was a humanitarian element to this beca
. >>> there are new radiation concerns in japan this morning. the country's nuclear crisis stretches into the third week. officials said today that highly radioactive iodine seeping from the fukushima nuclear complex may be making its way into seawater north of the plant. mounting obstacles like inadequate storage tanks where efforts have been hindered to bring the facility back from disaster. the water must be removed and safely stored before work can continue to power up the cooling system. they just don't know how long that's going to take before they can get the workers into the plant. adding to the sense of unease across japan, a strong earthquake shook the region today and prompted a brief tsunami alert. measured a magnitude 6.5 and no damage or injuries were reported. radiation from japan appears to have reached as far as the u.s. east coast at least in trace amounts. one sample of massachusetts rainwater registered very low concentrations of radiation. officials say it does not pose a health risk. very latest, let's bring in nbc's lee cowan in tokyo. what's the latest there? >> reporter: we
workers from japan's crippled nuclear power plant ended up in the in the hospital today. they sustained beta ray radiation burns to their legs. they're part of a three-man team working to restore cooling systems at reactor three. smoke could be seen rising from those reactors again. >>> japan's considering bringing in bottled water from overseas. panicked shoppers have cleaned out stores across tokyo after officials warned yesterday not to give tap water to infants. officials say radiation levels in tap water are now back to normal. >>> the u.s. ambassador to japan visited an evacuation center in miyagi prefecture, the hardest hit by the quake and tsunami. it's believed miyagi alone lost 15,000 people. >>> nbc's lee cowan has the latest now from the region. he's in seoul, south korea. lee, good day to you. >> reporter: hey, contessa. yeah, every day, as we've been talking about all week, the death toll seems to climb here. we're now up to nearly 9,700 people that are confirmed dead, nearly 17,000 missing. some 250,000 people remain homeless and another 300,000 are still living in shelte
. appreciate it. >> you bet. >>> in japan, americas are being urged to get supplies of iodine tablets. the very latest on the dangerous nuclear reactors. a full update after this. [ male announcer ] this is charlie whose morning flight to london starts with arthritis pain... and a choice. take tylenol now, and maybe up to 8 in a day. or...choose aleve and 2 pills for a day free of pain. enjoy the flight. you struggle to control your blood sugar. you exercise and eat right, but your blood sugar may still be high, and you need extra help. ask your doctor about onglyza, a once daily medicine used with diet and exercise to control high blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. adding onglyza to your current oral medicine may help reduce after meal blood sugar spikes and may help reduce high morning blood sugar. [ male announcer ] onglyza should not be used to treat type 1 diabetes or diabetic ketoacidosis. tell your doctor if you have a history or risk of diabetic ketoacidosis. onglyza has not been studied with insulin. using onglyza with medicines such as sulfonylureas may cause low blood sugar.
of spreading radiation from the crippled power plant in japan with even more people now being encouraged to get out of the area, but not ordered. how great is that danger? >>> plus, a little politics with hispanics now making up one of our every six americans and one out of every four children, by the way. how long can republicans be seen as hostile to their interests? the huge implications of the census report on the 2012 presidential election. and finally, what's the more serious candidates to do? how does anyone who actually believes they have a chance of winning the republican nomination get heard if people like michele bauchmann, sarah palin, and donald trump suck up the oxygen. >>> we start with what's next on the libyan front. nbc chief foreign correspondent richard engel is in benghazi after a heralding couple of days. what happened today on the ground in libya that you've seen? >> reporter: tdaye went out of benghazi and instead of going to the rebel frontline about 100 miles south of here, we went to the frontline and then went around it. and we were able to get inside the city of ajd
controller who has been suspended. >>> ahead, our first look at workers inside japan's crippled nuclear plant who are trying to prevent that meltdown, two of them now hospitalized. we'll tell you what happened. plus, a massive firebreaks out at miami's international airport. flights have been affected by this. what happened here? incredible video. >>> michele bachmann, step closer to making an announcement on her potential presidential aspirations for 2012. what she said a short time ago.e running there? dancing there? how about eating soup to get there? campbell's soups fill you with good nutrition, farm-grown ingredients, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. the morning after the big move starts with back pain... and a choice. take advil now... and maybe up to 4 in a day. or, choose aleve and 2 pills for a day free of pain. smart move. ♪ >>> wk back to "news nation." take a look at this raging fire early this morning at miami international airport. the blaze at the fuel depot finally brought under control. dozens of flights in and out of miami
're expecting that announcement at 3:00 eastern time. >>> still touch and go at japan's nuclear power plant, but they're still structure ally sound. smoke started rising from reactor numbers two and three. the smoke eventually stopped. the plant operator says it's not clear what started the smoke in the first place. >>> the just is making potassium iodide to u.s. personnel in tokyo and abu ghraib, trophy pictures of soldiers posing with bodies of afghan civiliance. what possibly could the military say to explain it? >>> plus it's a list no parent wants to see their teen's name on. and the latest case of cyber bullying. >>> a dramatic rescue of an entire family including a six month old puppy. [ sneezes ] allergies? you think i have allergies? you're sneezing. i'm allergic to you. doubtful, you love me. hey, you can't take allegra with fruit juice. what? yeah, it's on the label. really? here, there's nothing about juice on the zyrtec® label. what? labels are meant to be read. i'd be lost without you. i knew you weren't allergic to me. [ sneezes ] you know, you can't take allegra with orange
for wednesday, march 23rd. a lot to tell you, including fears about the safety of food coming out of japan as u.s. puts a halt on some imports. plus, look at the scene outside today. this is happening right for you. two days into spring and it's snowing across the northeast. we'll have the ugly forecast that spans not just from here but all the way across this country. >>> first let's get to the news at 30 rock in new york city. four days of allied strikes apparently battered moammar gadhafi's air force and largely destroyed his air defense systems. however, there's little evidence the attacks have stopped his forces from killing civilians or shifted the balance of power in favor of the rebels yet. yesterday's gadhafi's loyalists made advances on misrata, the last opposition-held city in gadhafi and ajdabiya. yesterday gadhafi appeared on television reportedly speaking from the same tripoli compound targeted by a coalition missile strike on sunday. remaining defiant, of course, saying we shall not surrender and fear passersby. we jeer at their missile. this assault is by a bunch of fashionists
much. >> thank you, andrea. >>> now to the latest to the crisis in japan. police there say the official death toll now has reached 9,800 people. 17,500 people still remain missing. two workers are trying to stabilize the fukushima nuclear power plant, two of those workers were injured when they stepped into radioactive water and were hospitalized, but authorities say that they were exposed to levels below the maximum allowed for plant workers. >>> the u.s. military has more than 19,000 marines and sailors, 20 ships, 140 aircrafts assisting with relief efforts in japan. and in a surprise move, north korea is helping out as well. kim jong-il has sent $500,000 million for relief for ethnic koreans living in japan. >>> today, tokyo's drinking water has been deemed safe again, a day after radiation levels sent many scrambling for bottled water. but some of the neighboring communities around tokyo are now reporting increased radiation levels. nbc' lee cowan is live for us in so seoul, south korea. the improvement, a day forward -- one step forward, two steps back. it seems not only the radiat
't drink the water. japan warns parents that radiation levels in tap water is dangerous for infants in tokyo. >>> health care one year later. the fifth grader turned activist who was with president obama when he signed the landmark law, joins us. >>> and -- >> doesn't seem fair. what i feel, what you felt long ago, when i was very young, i could say to myself this was how love was. >> the death of a hollywood legend. elizabeth taylor dies from congestive heart failure at the age of 79. we will talk exclusively with her sixth husband, former u.s. senator, john warner. >>> and good day, everyone, i'm andrea mitchell, live in washington. we begin with developing news out of jerusalem today. israeli officials report that one woman now has died after a bomb tore through the crowd at a bus stop in the center of jerusalem. dozens of people were injured in the explosion, labeled a terrorist attack by israeli police. the city is on high alert. the entrance to jerusalem has been closed. michael oren is israel's ambassador to the united states and joins me now. first of all, our condolences. t
to unbelievable military support of the situation in japan, ongoing effort, obviously in afghanistan and our ongoing effort to wind down the war in iraq, we thought it was much more important rather than sit by and watch the slaughter of these innocents, to bring along is the international community. we didn't wait to see where the international community was, we brought them along. now we have an opportunity to press for the kind of opportunity for 9 opposition that i think they're looking for and they're taking. >> denis, i just want to nail something down, you fellows, people in the administration led by the president, with the guidance of the people around him, including the secretary of state and others, you believed gadhafi was going to do what he said. he was using terms like disinfected germs, go house by house, go into closets. you believed he was going to do that on a mass basis? >> well, there certainly was a lot of evidence to suggest as much, chris, and given the history of this country and the great things that we have done to protect innocents and various instances across hist
>>> a suspected breach at the reactor core of one of the crippled nuclear plants. japan's prime minister calls the situation grave and serious. a sea of protesters in yemen with demonstrators demanding their leader leave now. what does all this mean for the u.s. war on terror? >>> asleep in the tower. troubling questions about who is keeping watch at the nation's other airports as officials now confirm an air traffic controller was napping on the job. >>> it's friday. so do you have your office beer ready? apparently booze in the workplace is making a comeback. could it actually make us more productive? >>> we begin with the devastate nug develop in japan, radioactive contamination from the troubled fukushima nuclear power plant more severe than first thought. japan's prime minister spoke just a short time ago, calling the situation there very grave and serious. nuclear safety officials now suspect a dangerous breach in the core of a reactor. the evacuation zone has expanded from a 12-mile radius. people who are up to 19 miles mr. the plant are being told to leave. >>> also this
. >>> japan's government says the cost of the earthquake and tsunami could reach $309 billion. infrastructure, housing and businesses in northeastern japan suffered extensive damage. if those estimates are correct, it would top the overall losses from hurricane katrina here in the united states. >>> hollywood's grand damme has died. elizabeth taylor died of congestive heart failure at a los angeles hospital, surrounded by her four children. nbc's peter alexander has more on the life of the legendary actress. >> reporter: she was one of the last of the screen goddesses from hollywood's golden age. >> one more crack, queeny, just one, and i will not only spit in your eye, but i will punch it black and blue. >> reporter: at the height of her career in the '50s and '60s, elizabeth taylor portrayed sexy, emotionally vulnerable heroines in some of the era's most memorable movies. >> help me! >> dawn. >> now i sound insane, don't i? >> are you trying to. >> reporter: born in london to american parents in 1942, elizabeth rose taylor moved to los angeles just before the outbreak of world war ii. >> ea
? >>> japan's radiation fears. a run on water and basic supplies in tokyo and at the crippled nuclear plant, workers sent to the hospital from exposure to beta rays. >>> and washington, we have a problem. the strange case of two ssenger jets forc to lan on ei oat d.c. mor rpt when no one answered at air traffic control. we'll have the latest on the investigation, just ahead. >>> good morning, everyone. it's thursday, march 24th, 2011. i'm savannah guthrie. chuck todd will be back tomorrow. also this morning, the president getting it from the right and the left in congress on libya, as he wakes up this morning back in washington. and we will talk to the libyan ambassador to the u.s., who left the gadhafi regime live here on "the daily rundown" later this hour. >>> also, the slow start to the 2012 republican race seems to be helping one candidate -- president obama. we'll have the latest poll. >>> but let's get to the rundown. and we'll start in libya, where a more complicated and potentially more dangerous phase of the military effort has begun. coalition war planes are now attacking gadhafi
in the show. again, she is dead at the age of 79. >>> want to turn now to the latest from japan, where a spike in radiation levels in tokyo's water supply has residents there on edge. we're joined by nbc news' chief science correspondent in tokyo, robert bazell. good to see you. we know the usda has put a hold on japanese imports into the u.s. on the wake of the radiation news. what are the big concerns there? >> reporter: well, here, willie, the concern is the water supply. there's a lot of concerns, of course, but the immediate concern in tokyo is the water supply as you mentioned. you can see here it's raining. and it's been raining heavily for days now, and what that rain does is it takes whatever's being released from the plant, the crippled nuclear plant, north of here, and drives it into the ground which drives it into the ground water. what happened today was the officials at the main water purification plant here discovered that radioactive iodine levels were twice as high as they should be for infants. they are still in the range considered safe for adults, but they advised parents t
nuclear power plant in japan where workers still desperately trying to prevent more radiation from seeping into the atmosphere. today officials report three work rz were exposed to radioactivity. two were sent to the hospital for treatment. meanwhile, workers distributing bottled water across tokyo after residents there cleared store shelves following yesterday's warning the city's tap water contained elevated radiation. japanese government also estimates this month's earthquake and tsunami could cost up to $309 billion in damage, which would make it the world's most expensive natural disaster ever. >>> this a-s a wild story. the national transportation safety board is now reviewing staffing at airports across the country after two passenger planes landed at reagan national airport yesterday without clearance because, according to aviation officials the air traffic controller fell asleep at reagan national airport in washington, d.c. the planes were carrying a total of 165 passengers and crew between them did land safely but they had to do it on their own after pilots took matters into the
are overwhelmed. >>> in sendai, japan, there are signs of recovery. u.s. marines are busy there helping to clear away cars and other debris left in the tsunami's wake. >> we've been clearing it for the past few days, so we're making good progress. >>> let's head to tokyo and nbc's lee cowan who's developing stories there. >> reporter: it all stems from the injuries to the workers we talked about yesterday, the ones that were in the basement level of unit number three. they were trying to strip a cable there. they came in contact with radioactive water and had to be taken to the water. they were actually transferred to a hospital here in tokyo today so they could monitor their condition a little more closely. the consider is that the radiation levels were so high, and the water they stepped in, some 10,000 times that it should be, that the fear is now there is some kind of leak at the reactor itself. they don't know whether it's an actual breach in the core or the pipes themselves that are leaking but something is leaking. we don't know how much or how long it's been leaking and we don't know why
morning, everybody. this is a shocking development out of japan. imagine how concerned you would be as a parent if there was radiation in the drinking water that was twice the recommended level for infants. >> that's what millions of parents in tokyo are dealing with this morning. levels of radioactive iodine were found at a treatment center. now parents are advised not to give it to infants. the latest in a live report from tokyo ahead. >> also ahead, richard engel has made his way to the rebel front lines in libya following a fourth straight night of coalition missile strikes. >> a lot of serious stories to talk about. but on a lighter note, have you seen this viral video. this is a 5-month-old boy who can't decide what to make of the sound of his mom blowing her nose. first he's laughing, then horrified. then bursts out laughing again. i think 8 million people have watched this online. we'll watch the little boy and his parents coming up. >> on a more serious note, the dangerousle levels of radiation in tokyo's drinking level. robert bazell joins us again this morning. hey, bo
so much for joining us. >> thank you. >>> and when we come back, radiation fears in japan. a tap water warning issues for infants in tokyo. >>> and the world loses a lenl jend. we look at the life of dame elizabeth taylor as colorful off screen as it was on. homeowners -- rates have been going up, but you can still refinance to a fixed rate as low as 4.75% at lendingtree.com. plus, get the best deal or we'll pay you $1,000. call lending tree at... today. her morning begins with arthritis pain. that's a coffee and two pills. the afternoon tour begins with more pain and more pills. the evening guests arrive. back to sore knees. back to more pills. the day is done but hang on... her doctor recommended aleve. just 2 pills can keep arthritis pain away all day with fewer pills than tylenol. this is lara who chose 2 aleve and fewer pills for a day free of pain. and get the all day pain relief of aleve in liquid gels. you struggle to control your blood sugar. you exercise and eat right, but your blood sugar may still be high, and you need extra help. ask your doctor about onglyza, a once
and sleeplessness. motrin pm. >>> black smoke is rising from reactor number 3, forcing workers to evacuate japan's fukushima nuclear plant today. officials haven't said what caused it or whether any radiation was released. the japanese have confirmed that radiation levels in tokyo's tap water is more than twice what's considered safe for babies. so word has gone out to the city's 13 million residents not to use tap water to make infant formula. >>> and more radiation concerns in food. the government has added broccoli, cauliflower and cabbage to the list of tainted vegetables consumers should avoid and the u.s. is the first to ban produce and dairy products from some parts of japan. >>> michi kaku is a city of new york professor of physics and author of "physics of the future." always good to see you. if obviously you gasp when you hear baby's formula can't be made with water. do you think it's a matter of time before children and adults are advised not to drink it? >> well the good news is radiation levels are still low and if there's no more radiation from the reactor in about a month radiatio
. meanwhile, japan and what is now the world's most expensive natural disaster. the government said today the earthquake and tsunami caused over $300 billion in damage. the human toll is also climbing with more than 9,500 dead, 16,000 are missing, fewer than ten are americans. the u.s. is now the first country to ban produce and dairy products from the area near the damaged nuclear plant. and in tokyo tonight parents are being warned not to give their infants tap water. radioactive iodine has been detected in the water at twice the level considered safe for babies. from tokyo, here's bill whitaker. >> reporter: tokyo mother of three tomoe ogino shows compassion for the refugees up north. now with the fallout hitting home, she feels fear. >> my concern is how long it's going to, this is going to take, you know, if it's going to finish at some point, if she can drink water. >> reporter: the fear is thyroid cancer, an infants fast growing thyroid absorbs much more of the radioactive iodine in the water than older children or adults. tomoe uses water to make formula for 4-month-old sayuki. it
very much. and the latest on the situation in japan, including an interactive photo blog just go to our website. still ahead, one heck of a fast food fight. a customer goes wild when she gets tired of waiting. and a mother is facing charges after allegedly encouraging her 14-year-old son to get into a fistfight so she could video tape it. all righty then. castrol syntec has been reformulated for better performance under the hood. so we gave it a new name. castrol edge with syntec power technology. new name. better formula. it's more than just oil. it's liquid engineering. add listerine® total care for more complete oral care. ♪ it works in six different ways to restore enamel, strengthen teeth, freshen breath, help prevent cavities, and kill bad breath germs for a whole mouth clean. so go beyond the brush with listerine® total care. the most complete mouthwash. and for visibly whiter teeth, try listerine® total care plus whitening. and for visibly whiter teeth, how are you getting to a happier place? running there? dancing there? how about eating soup to get there? campbell's soups
to people in places like japan and kwlab. between to switch gears and talk about the crisis in japan. tokyo's drinking water supply has spiked to radiation levels dangerous for infants. emergency workers were evacuated yet again. robert bazell is in tokyo with the details on this story. bob, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. you can see it is raining here in tokyo now. the fact is it has been raining like this for days. it has driven the radiation escaping from the plant into the ground and into the groundwater. as a result, main distribution station for water here in tokyo, they found radioactive iodide levels. you can imagine that's very concerning for a lot of parents. at the reactor itself as we pointed out, some signs of progress but the black smoke and other things are setbacks. this is a crisis that shows no sign of ending any time soon. at this water plan that serves the greater tokyo area, officials found levels of iodide twice as high it is a standard for infants. officials told parents to only give infants bottled water. yet again today black smoke rising from reactor numb
on the attac >>> setback. just hours after officials reporting progress at the nuclear plant in japan. smoke rising from the reactor forced them to evacuate again. this as japan halts shipments of milk and vegetables near the site over fears of contamination. >>> and a female wing walker fighting for her life after her husband was forced to crash land the airplane. he speaks about her condition today, monday march 21, 2011. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good morning. welcome to "today" on a monday morning. busy monday morning. i'm matt lauer. ann curry is back from japan, in for meredith. what an extra job you did over that on what had to be a difficult trip. >> it was difficult for everyone involved. i think we are all thinking of the people that are still there and especially there japanese. we'll have the latest from japan including the latest evacuation of the workers from the nuclear power plant and also the detection of radiation on spinach and milk coming up, matt. >> also ahead the u.s. army is issuing an apology for disturbing photos that portray abuse allegedly
in the battle to prevent radiation from leaking from the nuclear reactor in japan. the news comes just a day after safety officials say they suspect a dangerous breach in the core of one reactor. workers are now switching to fresh water as they try to cool the reactors. they say the salty sea water they were using before could cause corrosion and clog up pipes. barges are helping to bring in more fresh water. and new numbers on the extent of the tragedy. the official death toll has surpassed 10,000 with 17,000 people who remain missing. nbc's lee cowen is live for us in tokyo. what are officials say about the high radiation levels detected in the sea waters near the plant? that has to be cause for concern. >> it is, alex. it's still below levels they say are harmful, but it's the second time the radiation levels have spiked and this time it's more than 1,000 times what it should be. that's going to spark monitoring systems along the coastline far more than the systems that are already in place. the higher than normal concentration of iodine in sea water is the latest worry for those struggli
.s. government and they are the families of the u.s. troops evacuating the country. japan, meantime, brings water in from overseas after panicked shoppers cleaned out store shelves across tokyo. parents were told not to give babies tap water because of high levels of radiation. they say the levels are back down today but the run on bottled water, no surprise, is expected to continue. >>> here's the provocative question. should unrulely kids and overweight passengers sit in separate sections on the planes and would you pay to sit in the separate sections? some passengers are fed up. and don't forget to weigh in on my twitter page. you're watching "jansing & co." only on msnbc. and protein for muscles. [ woman announcing ] beneful incredibites. another healthful, flavorful beneful. now in a convenient bag. to london starts with arthritis pain... and a choice. take tylenol now, and maybe up to 8 in a day. or...choose aleve and 2 pills for a day free of pain. enjoy the flight. or...choose aleve and 2 pills for a day free of pain. curtis: welcome back to geico gecko: caller steve, go right ahead. stev
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)